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changed the dialogue from not my version of government is better than yours to the belief government isn't right. the person who believes the government is a workable instrument as to fight to a resistant to that. during the depression and the dust bowl during the second world war and other periods we have had a sense of shared sacrifice to get things done that democracy is the politics of the half love. not everybody gets everything. when we realize we are going to have to give it up it is given up in the back roomgz i think this take no prisoners my way or the highway attitude shows an incredible lack of the awareness of what it means to govern in the united states. >> and what government should do to help people particularly in a distressed economy and what the limits are before you infringe on personal freedom. >> that's right. every decade has an example of it. we have to find the balance i think. history is a good ally in that in so far as we do not see government as all bad or all good. in that balance has been the most spectacular history. our government has been a force for good
are moral and big government isn't." we are at freedom fest in las vegas, where mr. forbes is speaking. mr. forbes, why is that free markets are moreover, but that government isn't. with an example of that? >> remake the emphasis of big government. going back to it james madison defined. but in terms of big government not being moral, it is the opposite of what it purports to do and creates an environment we have less ability to get ahead increased dependency and not a sense of independence. it plessis crony capitalism, which hurts oil entrepreneurship and creativity. all the things the government says it does hopes the poor to make sure the markets: the right direction. they do the opposite. their short-term oriented, writes to the next election. they have their own agenda. they don't respond to the marketplace the way business has to do. they have their own agenda of interest groups. the bigger they get, the more harm they do on the less chance you have to improve your lot in life. >> host: how is it free markets make it moral? is morality part of capitalism? >> guest: morality is the b
in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it
're going to hit the roof and see how much more money they're paying to the government and how much less in their wallet to spend at that store they love so much. so the real-- this is a precursor to the real nasty stuff that happens after january 1st if we don't get a deal that keeps taxes low forever. >> to susan's point, if the people stop spending and so alarmed about this, they're going to be marching on congress to get a deal done, aren't they? >> we need a deal done, i think we all agree, we need a deal done. >> brenda: okay, that's, we're not going to go there right now. we've got to talk about the fact that right now, we do have about a week more to do a deal, but consumers are pulling ck, confidence is low. gary b? >> well, absolutely. and the only way the consumer is going to get ou and spend, it's a double-edged sword. when i went around the fall, the only stores doing limited 2 where it was 50% off everything. limited 2 can't make money at 50% off everything. the markup is normally, a keystone markup or 100% to give away 50% they're giving away their profits, so if that's th
>> panic and terror as a government airstrike kills dozens waiting for bread in central syria. the attack happened as the u.n. and mediators arrived in damascus. this is al jazeera live. indian protesters defied a ban and take to the streets to vent their anger over a bridge toll -- brutal gang rape. the head of the u.s. gun moll goes on television to defend his call for armed guards in every school. they are helping keep kids out of trouble in south africa. welcome to the program. all they were trying to do was buy bread. this has turned into a tragedy in central syria. dozens of people are said to have died at the bakery was hit by a government air strike. this is as they arrived in damascus for more talks aimed at ending the violence. >> panic, chaos, anger. this is the aftermath of what the opposition says was an air strike carried out by a syrian fighter jet. the observatory for human rights says those killed and wounded were queueing outside a bakery. only five days ago it was under the control of government forces. in the rebels recently opened a new battlefront and thi
of the entirety of american history. one looked at the union government, the structure of the states and the federal government in the union in the state's and the federal the limit in the confederacy and says the confederacy was the state. they succeeded on state rights and then they had to build and proceeded to because they had to build this enormous state apparatus. they conscripted within a year. think about that as a statement of state power. they conscripted within a year and they passed the taxes within basically a year, and they had agents of the federal government all over the south literally taking food out of people's barnes. it was the only way that they could feed the army. so, fay and pressed which was an enormous fight, that is the fascinating part of the story is these huge slaveholders go to war to protect and then they find out the new government is there to protect them in the war but it turns out the federal government wants to and needs to use them to win the war. it is this the enormous cost of between the slave holders and the government and they also read equ
after silvio berlusconi's party with her support for the government. >> we have a friendship feeling, but in the framework that is quite puzzling. this cannot constitute the basis, aside for other reasons, this cannot be the basis for affecting a proposal for me to become the leader of the moderates, he has said. that is the outgoing prime minister. what is next for him? >> is still speaking right now. he has announced he is going to launch some sort of change where he will lay out what whoever will the prime minister next year will have to follow to make sure what has been done by his government in the last year is not undone. he has stabilized the economy. now it needs to grow from alan. to grow, you need to pass even more unpopular reforms. he has said whoever wins, the party should not destroy what was billed. it was a pledge to the next government. do not and do what was done by us. do not criticize europe or try to get out of europe. play an active role in it. all of the points he was making almost directed at soviet gross tony who has said he will run for prime minister and ha
cpi would change the way the federal government calculate inflation. which could possibly save the government $300 billion over the next decade if implemented. normally every year, wages and prices go up. the consumer price index, the cpi measures how much they go up by tracking a basket of goods that americans typically buy. it's important, it's used to calculate cost of living adjustments on social security. checks pay a little more each year in line with inflation, as calculated by the cpi. now one potential flaw in the system, cpi assumes people don't change their basket of the price of meat goes up. they don't switch from meat to chicken because the price of beef has gone up. they don't switch from say, arugula to iceberg lettuce, it doesn't account for how behavior changes. chained cpi presents a chained basket of goods, measuring how people react to price changes, not simply the fact that prices have changed. now chained cpi would account for fact that you're buying more chicken when beef is too expensive. that could result in a slower rate of inflation, it saves the gov
themselves decide. we are not a totalitarian government. if you don't work you are fired. that's crazy . let t workers decide. they are giving up their christmas and family that dape. it is it a traditional day and sometimes it is better that they don't work on the day and better for them without them knowing it. that day is set aside for a family and for a special occasion and we should observe it >> butalt the same time, tracey. a lot of restaurants do this. starbucks and dens and jack in the box and mcdonalds is getting in line. >> it is capitalism at its best and i don't think people is this come down on the workers either. the notion of getting away from the christian. maybe we should everything on christmas . people should be at home. but we can't be flippant. if you do i want like it go get another job. it is it not that easy . they will be worried if they don't come in christmas day, they may lose their job it is it unfair to a lot of people. i understand capitalism but i think you ought to have emotion as well >> fair tosk them to come in for three. >> it is not three. >> it is not
conditions, does the government have the rule and saying you need to ensure preexisting conditions? >> guest: yes, but she don't want to join the premium below the cost of care because the insurance company isn't going to want you and is going to treat you poorly. so what we recommend is being able to ensure an advance against preexisting conditions so if you have to pay a higher premium on insurance that pays a higher premium. but also we need affordable insurance. we don't have it dandruff on the care. if you own your own insurance, take a job to job. >> host: the employer system, is it time to not be the system? >> guest: i believe in free markets. employers do what they need to do. but let's have a level playing field. once in every state make it illegal for the employer to buy for employees insurance they can take with them for the next job. we need to abolish laws, turn everything around and encourage affordable insurance. >> host: what is the argument in favor of having it divided by states? >> guest: i can't think of any argument i find persuasive. you want to buy insurance across st
leaders, apparently, is not a fan of cutting government spending. wonder why he wore red, but i digress. house minority leader nancy pelosi using props to deliver pretty much-- >> more than 20 million children will have reduced food and nutrition benefits. merry christmas to you and yours. 1 1.7 sick million seniors will lose meals on wheels. happy holidays to you. >> neil: 330 million americans will face a receion, happy holiday to you. no wonder why nothing else is getting down. today, charles payne, adam lashinsky, charlie gasperino gerri willis. >> i'm used to by nancy pelosi. overarching democrats, ything that republicans want to do that smacks of fiscal responsibility is mean-spirited. beyond mean-spirited they hate, children, hate seniors, hate, hate, hate. just in the name of getting the country fixed up so we have longevity and continued prosperity. it's a terrible way for someone in that power position to govern, i really think so. >> neil: it's a tough way to come back to the negotiating table from the other side. >> exactly, where are they? they went home. where are our lead
that the government there was unsustainable because it really did not have a loyalty of the people. and that no matter what we tried to do. it would not have lasted for very long time after we left. afghanistan's i think somewhat different. it's not a matter of one piece of it geographically taking over the other piece. et is a matter of a nation -- it is a matter of a nation that's never really been unified at all tightly. but since then it's become clear that it's not a nation in the ordinary sense. that it's so factionalized that no matter what we do, it's not going to be possible to create the kind of modern state that might become stable and satisfactory from our point of view. under those circumstances, i think the right question is what do we need to do to keep afghanistan from becoming endangered of the united states -- a danger to the united states? the way it is most likely to become a danger to the united states i think is through its influence on pakistan. which to me is the most dangerous place in the world. and i don't think that trying to stabilize the afghan situation by building up tr
. will have our roundtable right after the break. first, the federal hot minute. >> the business of government is going through a dynamic change driven by sequestration and other trends. there is no shortage of articl on research of the topic. the president of the professional services council urges the department of defense not to repeat the mistakes made in the early '90s when cut were made across the board and the work force was disproportionately impacted. he urges the cuts should now be more strategic. the story on how it is having a negative impact on the profit of vendors selling to the fed's. therefore, it should be no surprise when you see the results of another survey put out by mamarket connections which shows how government contractors arare seekingevenue opportunities oututside the federal government.. >> we havepent recent weeks looking for a holiday g gift from capitol hill. automatic spending cuts due to kick in in a matter of days but we do not have a bomb of coal to shshow for these talks. two of our favorites -- professor peter momorici from the univsity of maryland and jo b
it was during the war but i wouldn't travel without the security from the iraqi government in my own private security. stomach michael gordon covered the war for "the new york times" and the endgame is his newest book. this is book tv on c-span2. >>> now from the 2012 miami book fair international, michael talked about his book what money can't buy the morrill in the markets in which he addresses the ethical question is their something wrong with the world in which everything is for sale? this is about 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you, david, everybody for coming. today i would like to engage all of us in a discussion of the question of the book. it's an easy question to state -- i'm sorry easy to answer what should be the role of money in markets in our society? today there are fewer things that money can't buy. if you are sentenced to a jail term and california just in case that happens to anyone of you, you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations you can buy a prison cell upgrade. it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? $5,000? $9
cavanaugh long time. with our entire one attorney together. government house is put to work in new jersey has a heart and spirit and sold it does much more for our city knowing about you and covenant house i felt very privileged to write the foreword because it would recognize the fact my dad would have been homeless himself. board to a single mother, very poor. and even more so. my dad was po. [laughter] he could not afford the other two letters. [laughter] but through his extraordinary love his family kept him on a trajectory forward. he was able to put first semester's tuition but it is a conspiracy of love makes me to i am today but it starts with the young people. what bothers me is he talks so dramatically in a negative fashion and we don't realize everyone end was of a child to prevent the challenges he faces as an adult. douglas said it is easier to raise strongmen. who i feel the urgency we do not prioritize our children as much as we should. >> you say the labor party is the forward. it is so from the heart and this week you are engaged in the snap challenge? >> i was up late wi
complicate federal state and local laws on the effectiveness of the governance of the agency and it will look all the financial over site and controls and status of implementations and prior recommendation and is other prior audits and recommendation that is have been made and i would also look at the other management and public housing resource and is including housing provided by section eight voucher and is as well as housing managed by other agencies and nonprofit corporation and is it will also look at the management and the ofl performance of agency personnel and we will look at how this agency compares in terms of best practices with other agencies not on in the region but nationally and so i want to thank the following members of the board for their co sponsorship. supervisor avalos, supervisor mar and supervisor a wonk walky. and the last point that i would make because i was pope hoping that is something that would be ri solved by the time we got to our last board meeting much has been set said in the press about charlie the doing that attacked a horse in a doing bleach area and i
government ends up taking it is important not to take guns out of the hands of hunters or fishermen. >> peter doosey, thank you very much. >> the fiscal cliff is looming and now the president has gone home for the holidays and left for hawaii without a deal in place. with nine days left now, is it too late? remember the house budget committee marcia blackburn joins us now. congressman thank you for joining us. >> sure. >> before we get underway, i would love to play for you. play for you right now the president's words just before he departed on his hawaii vacation. here he is. >> so as we leave town for a few days to be with our families for the holidays, i hope it gives everybody some perspective. everybody can cool off. everybody can drink some eggnog and have some christmas cookies and sing some christmas carols and enjoy the company of loved ones. >> and then, congressman, just after he said that senator jeff sessions of alabama said this, and i shall quote, president obama today gave another speech about the fiscal cliff, no plan, nothing that can be scored or analyzed, just another spe
a country, we have the articles of confederation, and that government's two weeks, writing the constitution. this is where the second amendment obviously comes in. how did that all development? what's the -- >> guest: well, nowadays it's become fashionable among people who support gun rights strongly to pick out this or that quotation from this or that leader like samuel adams, thomas jefferson, or whoever and apply the second amendment was seen as a way to enable individuals to defend themselves and defend themselves against the government when it was tie tyrannical. that's a mismonsing. it was a political matter, the second amount. it was part of what became the bill of rights, and the reason for it is that when -- after the unhappy experience of the articles of confederation that led the founders to try to figure out a better way to govern the country, they came up with the constitution which we know is full of checks and balances, but as it was submitted to the states for ratification, it became clear that they might not get the nine states needed unless there were promises of still mor
. this now is an admission which the government has been very reluctant to make but which reflects the actual reality. so there you have the full -- politics and religion because the weapon, the motivation of the foot soldiers, is to create an islamic state in nigeria. it's not something that anybody dreams of. there are videos, the usual two rifles crossing each other, and we want an islamic state. in fact, one of their leaders went so far, when the government was -- political leaders were proposing amnesty and talk, no, going to talk to the president as a christian, until he converts. then we're willing to sit down and negotiate with him. and so each time i hear the government say, oh, please come on, talk to us, we'll listen now. we don't know what you want. i said, don't be stupid. they said it so often and you know very well what their motivation is. that is the reason for the devastation of the north today. a country in which utter years, years of independence, certain sections of the country consider the rest nonmuslims, whether christians, or whatever, as subhumans. disposable materia
to social entrepreneurs. we focus on organizations working outside of government because we feel societe has more flexibility ban government contractors. charities used to be independent but now are contractors to the government. that is all you need the social impact bond to hold them accountable. john: i would rather use the money than government but government is captured. >> ben taxpayers want to know they get something for it to. recently these agencies have a good cause. that is different of kids not going back to jail. john: mark zuckerberg maybe feeling guilty gave $100 million to the new work public-school system. i see that it throws a down the drain giving it to the union's who ruined it in the first place. >> don't fund the problem. find the solution. that means if you see something terrible of the world, poverty you have to say our not just give money to anti-poverty but give money to organization and has a way to tackle the issue. john: how do know it will work? goldman sachs puts up their own money. john: you will give them yoga and meditation therapy? it sounds like nonsense.
a distance has been incredible. i can't imagine the daily pressures of governing this great state. i can't imagine the arrows that are thrown her way all the time. but i can see with clarity the conviction and the integrity and the character that you're dealing with, and south carolina is better because we have nikki haley as our governor and i look forward to pressing the flesh on economic issues, having the opportunity to work on making sure that our economy in this state continues to hum like an engine and get on the team with nikki haley, to make sure that all of america continues to hear the great things about south carolina. thank you very much. \[applause] >> thank you, tim. and now to our conservative rock star for the state of south carolina and our conservative rock star for now the country and the heritage foundation, senator jim demint. \[applause] >> governor, when you say there will never be anyone like me in the senate again, most of washington says thank goodness. \[laughter] but i'm excited about what's going on today. the only thing or one of the few things i worried ab
other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san fr
departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work that they're doing. they're based here out of san francisco and they've got a great announcement to make. >> i am jon mills. i'm ceo of motion loft. we started about three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francis
of people talking tonight. >>> i spy with my little eye. the government issues a warning to parents about who's tracking your kids, their personal information and what they're doing on all those mobile devices. >>> and how does he do it? >> he types is the house number and then the name appears up on the ipad. >> for the inside scoop on all things santa, we went straight to the experts. >> he showed me where the elves were. >>> good evening. after the his defiant and controversial response on friday to renewed calls for stronger gun laws in the wake of the connecticut school shooting, the head of the nra finally took questions today. wayne lapierre sat down with nbc's david gregory this morning to explain why he opposes an assault weapons ban and why he wants to address gun violence in schools with more guns. it is an emotional debate touching still-tender nerves over the deaths at sandy hook elementary among those who hold dear their constitutional right to own guns. we have two reports tonight beginning with white house correspondent peter alexander in our washington newsroom tonight. p
't dohat the government said they have to do via the health care law. >> i was corrected. 1.3 million a day. that is the daily fine they have to pay. >> let's make an important distunction we are notuve for dinner bets. mipemine is open for the anybody who doesn't think they will get exempted. i think it is. they have been giving health care to the employees over in the charity for years. theirob ligation is not health care, but it is a religious problem and it is going to be dealt w. i hope that the corporions in the country will take a lesson and understand the importance of health care to employees insteaof cutting hours. >> and emac. hobby lobe just received notice from the court this week that they are not going to get an exception and they face a 1.3 million fine every day that they don't adhere to the practices that they abhor. >> that is it bad. this is a high cost of affordable care. the nuns may have to cut health insurance. but the people are quickly turning in the favor factory that the tax code and. this is driving businesses over ss and no one is reading that 3.7 million words
back then is it's not going to work if you put in this year a big surge in government spending, even if that makes gdp go up this year, next year it goes down again. so if we're going to do to policies they're going to recommend, we had to know it would be great next year, and we could afford to lose the 2% growth, and we'd take the stimulus away. since that didn't seem plausible at the time, what we argued back then -- i could e-mail you testimonies -- was that we need to pursue policies somewhat reminiscent of what we see in the 4% growth chapter now. we were talking about what next steps should be, and there wasn't a democratic senator in that hearing who was willing to defend the stimulus on the record. and i was, i was being, you know, pretty combative in my testimony, and nobody argued with me. and the point is that the economy is still terrible. i think 2% is actually optimistic for what we're growing right now. and everybody wants to do something to fix it, and that's a great opportunity for a president that's willing to try something new. >> thank you. and i just wanted to e
to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating committee and the planning committee for their excellent work in ensuring that those very important community members who do so much to ensure that our communities remain strong and vibrant, those who are under served typically continue to be served that our communities are strengthened and our ties are bound and strong. so, in 2012, of this year, we are very lucky enough to have two very distinguished honorees for our distinguished service a word for the city and county of san francisco and the first person we will recognize tonight is vera noon tear if you can please u.s.a. plast she is the social director at the arab culture and community center and she helps hundreds of families in trans by providing social work service and is i know how important that work is and how difficult that work is and i can't thank you enough to ensure t
government. throughout this process, we enjoyed superb cooperation from the department of state. the decision to brief you on the report's findings reflect a commitment to transparency at the department's highest levels. let me give you a brief introduction to events that night, and then ask admiral mullen to share the findings of the report, and then i will return briefly to talk about the overarching recommendations. what happened on september 11 to 12th in benghazi was a series of attacks in multiplications by unknown assailants -- multiple ocations, by unkownown assailants. what they had was not enough, either for the general threat environment benghazi, and certainly against the overwhelming number of attackers and weapons they faced. the state department had not given benghazi the security, both physical and personal resources it needed. let me ask admiral mullen if you will please relate to you or specific findings. -- our specific findings. >> thank you, mr. ambassador. i appreciate your leadership throughout this process. good afternoon. the board found that the attacks and benghazi
my sadness over the passing of senator daniel inouye. he came to this government 60 years ago in the legislature hawaii. he came to congress when hawaii became a state in 1959, to the snalt in 63, second nonl service to robertbird. this is a seers man, a solid man, a patriot and one who always had a good spirit about whow he conducted his affairs and how rerelated to other members of the senate and to his constituents and to the american people. he served in the most violent combat, previously wounded himself. part of the 342ened combat team, a 4,000 man unit who served in brutele combat. they were replaced 3.5 time in personnel to maintain their strength. 14,000 served in that combat in italy. 9,000 500 received purple hearts, 21 medal of honors including senator inouye's medal of honor. and it was a remarkable time and remarkable commitment that he demonstrated to the country that he loved. i know we'll talk about his record and i may do that later myself but i just want to say what i think about daniel inouye in his core. he shared with us at prayer breakfast. we don't quot
and they might be influenced by some violent popular culture. but how is the government going to identify the darkest thoughts in people's minds before they do anything? well, what government can do easily, however, is make it much harder for these people to have access to guns. a few hours before the newtown murders, a man entered a school in the province in china, obviously, mentally disturbed, he tried to kill as many children as he could. but all he had access to was a knife. the result, despite many injured, not one child died. the problems that for deuproduc newtown mas ker. you find my column on cnn.com/fareed. let's get started. >>> so, let's get right to it. a conversation about the real economic problems this country faces on my right and on their right glen hubbard the former chief economic adviser of cheney campaign. on my left, peter orzack, obama former budget director and sort of in the middle, the economist, economics editor and kristen editor of reuters digital. i promised we were going to get past the cliff. but i have to ask a few questions about it. you don't think it'
attention. not just local people, but the federal government. they would write letters and nobody would pay any attention. the civil rights commission decided they would see what they had to say and they have the power to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said the reason why you want to get it passed by congress and said it issuing executive orders is because my attorney general tells me that's the only way they can subpoena anybody. given what the problems are cumbersome people may not want to come to testify. so the commission's most important power was subpoena and they went in the south of october with a place to see what the problems were and they made recommendations that are controversial, they seem to make sense. so after the then there for a while, it was clear they needed to be reauthorized and continue to work on these issues. the whole civil rights movement started to heat up. it was clear there was a need. then the commission spent the next few years figuring out what to recommend to the government to bring to fruition what these people are protesting about in the streets. another is
with the government. that's a problem with this congress in particular. is that they wait until the last minute and they try to cram all this stuff down instead of making a structural change. what needs to happen is a structural change of medicare, social security and medicaid and we need of look at the other spending areas as well. we're still talking about less than 40% of the government and we really need to look at the entire government and they can't do that in 20 days of helter skelter rushing. i'm hopeful they will come to their senses, do a short-term temporary measure and have a comprehensive review in the first quarter of next year, like any business would do it. >> you make a lot of sense, don. it just seems like we need structural change to these programs because we can't afford them the way they're going right now, right? >> that's right. and american's lives have changed. social security was a very good idea and still is a good idea but we're living a lot longer now than when social security was originally started. so we're much more productive. for example, i see people every day
'll see happening as well, government starts to become smarter, make better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we sell and a lot of different vertical. we also ha
that the government can regulate things we agree as a society we don't want and we do that with cigarettes, we do that with alcohol and should do it with other drugs. >> paul: thanks, mary. if you have your own hit or miss, please send it to us at ger@foxnews.com and follow us on twitter@gerfnc. thanks to my fan and all of you watching, i'm paul gigot and hope to you right here next week. >> on fox news watch. >> i'm sorry, mr. ambassador, but your statement that the president and ambassador-- and secretary clinton made clear that it was a terrorist attack right afterwards is not true. it's not accurate. >> jon: following the release of the benghazi report which slams the state department for failures at high levels, congressional hearings get underway to unravel the murky details surrounding the deadly terror attack on our consulate. >> i want to first start by apologizing to the deputy-secretaries because you have been brought here as an ruse. >> jon: but the probe turned into a political face-off. some ignored the issues. are the media following their lead? >> shortly after 9:30 this morning,
to the american people. there are three branches of government, you know, we didn't elect president obama to be the dictator. we have another branch which, where the democrats lost and people who voted for republicans were very concerned about the size of government, paul. i mean, they've allowed this to be a debate about tax rates, but the real problem, i think, for most republicans and people who voted for them is that they see how the cost s rate that is just unsustainable. i mean, the country cannot survive the kinds of increases in entitlement payoffs that will occur if there's not reform. >> paul: there's at least in my reporting, the president has offered only one substantive entitlement reform and that's a change how we calculate inflation for benefits and tax brackets and that was agreed to last year. it's really minor in the scheme of things, nothing else sustainable. >> i think that the president is overplaying his hand, paul. he's going to need republican vote next year to raise the debt ceiling and needs the republicans votes for second term items, immigration reform and humi
of its role in city government i think that this has to be done and that's one of the reasons i wanted to have it on the agenda, so i appreciate the comments, and again mr. fried. >> yeah. i want to make sure there are no other am whys we wanted to look at. >> >> on next year's agenda and spent so much time on that one. >> in terms of goals and objectives colleagues? we heard from commissioner olague about -- i think a very, very good issue which is the issue of committee appointments and the structure where you have split appointments as opposed to simply mayoral appointments and how that works. i think that is one possibility. commissioner avalos. >> just a vague idea that i want to put out there that could be looked at by lafco maybe. one is we talk about san francisco's growing economy, and it's especially growing in the tech sector. there was a report in the paper today from the bay area council study and uc berkeley study there is a great multiplying effect happening right now with jobs created but i'm wondering if the city having greater or in the water to make sure that w
think that most americans are members of the tea party principally. we believe in limited government. we believe in lower taxes. we believe in keeping the government out of your pockets. if you believe in freekts, -- free markets, those are the basic tenets of the tea party. i would hope we all believe in that. that would be a decisive yes. >> \[inaudible] >> you look at his scorecard with the heritage action. he was a 98 and i was closing in on i think it was a 090. there was a couple that separated us, maybe some of the more well-known votes. other than that, i'm not quite sure where we disagree. i would think philosophically we're on the same page and hopefully we'll continue to work together. i look forward to hearing more from the senator. >> last question. >> \[inaudible] >> that's a great question. you know, i think if john was here with me today he would say, tim, don't forget, it's not about growing up in life, it's about moving forward. and we define that differently. some see the senate as a move up, and i certainly do as well in a way. but i'm hoping that the message that the
there. we all know the budget constraints that all these governments are under. on the other side, the president of the national education association says we do not need guns in schools, period. >> well, they need protection. the kids need protection. bill clinton thought they needed protection. the israelis have tested it, and it works there. you know, what we've suggested that each school district and each school administrator look at the problem that they face. right now you have a mix. you have federally funded officers in many schools. you have a mix of funding in other schools sprup volunteers in some place where's administrators are armed with concealed carry and all that. we're not saying that it ought to be this or that, that one size fits all program will work. what we are saying is the first obligation that we have is to protect our children and the way do you that is you look at the problem. and know-- >> schieffer: don't you try to also try to get some of these guns off the streets, get some of these guns out of markets? every study shows that when a society-- the fe
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